Corvallis Workers Comp Attorneys

The relationship between employee and employer is mutually beneficial. The employee goes to work each day and completes the tasks he or she is responsible for, and the employer provides a safe environment within which to do the work, as well as a monetary compensation for the time spent. As part of providing as safe environment, the employer carries workers’ compensation insurance, which entitles an employee to financial benefit should he or she become injured on-the-job.

Workers compensation benefits are meant to pay for medical costs and two-thirds of lost wages as a result of an on-the-job injury. However, once a claim for benefits has been filed, the relationship is now between the employee, and the large insurance company that owns the workers’ compensation insurance plan. The adjustor for this insurance company has his marching orders and they are to pay as little as possible for each claim. In fact, if a claim can be dismissed without payment – all the better.

At Shelsinger & deVilleneuve this is exactly how our practice got started, with a fervent passion to fight for “the little guy” against the large insurance companies, and secure the benefits that are just and deserved. For four decades we have navigated the workers’ compensation claim process, and we are well-versed in all of the tricks and tactics that an insurance company might try in an effort to not pay full benefits.

Some of the benefits that you might be entitled to when you file a workers’ compensation claim are:

  • Time Loss. When you are injured on the job, sometimes the injury is so significant that you are unable to work for a period of time. During that time, you are not earning any income, but you still have household bills to pay. Time loss benefits under the workers’ compensation law could provide you with two-thirds of your average income during this time. Your average income is calculated by researching your wages earned during the 52 weeks prior to the date of injury.
  • Medical benefits. Any health care services that you receive as a result of your on-the-job injury could be paid for through the medical benefits portion of your workers’ compensation claim. This includes: office visits, diagnostics, surgery, lab work, medications, hospital costs, and mileage to and from health care visits.
  • Permanent disability. In some cases, an on-the-job injury is so significant that the employee cannot return to work at all. These situations are covered under the permanent disability section of workers’ compensation. A lump sum will be calculated based on the severity of the permanent injury, and how greatly it impacts your ability to work.
  • Vocational rehabilitation. This program is designed to train an injured worker on how to do a job different from what they were doing prior to injury.

If you have been injured on-the-job, there are some steps that you should take. First, make sure that you receive medical attention. Even if the injury seems insignificant, you should see a medical professional and have the injury looked at. Next, you should notify your employer of the injury in writing. While they are likely aware that you were injured, you must follow up with a written report of what happened. This report should give the same account as was given to the medical professional. It is important to be honest and never exaggerate when talking about your on-the-job injury. Finally, make sure to contact our office and schedule a consultation. Having a qualified and experienced workers’ compensation attorney in your corner will make all the difference.